Top salads with eggs to better absorb vegetables’ carotenoids — ScienceDaily

Adding eggs to a salad with a variety of raw vegetables is an effective method to improve the absorption of carotenoids, which are fat-soluble nutrients that help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress, according to research from Purdue University.

“Eating a salad with a variety of colorful vegetables provides several unique types of carotenoids, including beta-carotene, lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene,” said Wayne Campbell, a professor of nutrition science. “The lipid contained in whole eggs enhances the absorption of all these carotenoids.”

This research is published online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and is funded by the American Egg Board-Egg Nutrition Center, National Institutes of Health and Purdue Ingestive Behavior Research Center.

via Top salads with eggs to better absorb vegetables’ carotenoids — ScienceDaily.

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6 High-Fat Foods You Should Be Eating

Fat is often associated with bad-for-you foods that can quickly sabotage any diet. Many dieters still flock to no-fat diets, opting to eat fat-free or reduced fat items. In fact, International Food Information Council data show that 67 percent of people try to eat as little fat as possible. However, if you’re part of that 67 percent, it’s time to make a change!

Contrary to popular belief, there are fatty foods that are actually good for us. Healthy fats keep us full longer, help reduce cravings for refined carbs and sugar, and can help with cell maintenance, repair, and healing, according to Shape. Additionally, healthy fats let fat-soluble vitamins and antioxidants be absorbed through your digestive system into your bloodstream, and some can even help fight inflammation. Eating healthy fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated) in moderation is crucial to your overall health. Ready to begin working healthy fats into your diet? Here are 6 fatty foods you should be eating.

1. Eggs

Inexpensive and a great source of protein, you can’t go wrong with eggs. Self writes that many people operate under the assumption that egg whites are the healthier option because they contain less fat than whole eggs. While technically true, you should also be eating the egg yolk, which is packed with key nutrients.

An egg contains 5 grams of fat, with only 1.5 of those grams being saturated, meaning the rest is good-for-you fats. Additionally, whole eggs also contain choline, which happens to be an important B vitamin your body needs in order to regulate your brain, nervous system, and cardiovascular system, according to Self. The bottom line here: When you’re preparing your morning breakfast, don’t be afraid to eat the whole egg. It’s good for you!

Watch How This Expert Preps His BBQ.

Source: Thinkstock

2. Fish

Salmon, mackerel, herring, lake trout, sardines, and albacore tuna are all fatty fish. But, WebMD writes that they’re good sources of Omega-3 fatty acids, which deliver some pretty powerful health benefits. Omega-3 fatty acid is fat your body can’t make on its own, and may help lower the risk of heart disease, depression, dementia, and arthritis.

How much of this fatty food should you be eating? According to WebMD, the American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of fatty fish a week. Aim for each serving to be 3 ounces, relatively the size of a deck of cards. Baked, grilled, or poached, there are plenty of ways to prepare fish dishes. If you aren’t a huge fan of it, experiment with recipes to ensure you’re getting in your weekly dose of fatty acids. Your heart, brain, and joints will thank you.



Read more:  6 High-Fat Foods You Should Be Eating.

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn’t : The Salt : NPR

Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn’t

by RAE ELLEN BICHELL

To refrigerate or not to refrigerate? It boils down to bacteria, aesthetics and how much energy you’re willing to use. Go in search of eggs in most foreign countries and you might encounter a strange scene: eggs on a shelf or out in the open air, nowhere near a refrigerator.Shock and confusion may ensue. What are they doing there? And are they safe to eat?

We Americans, along with the Japanese, Australians and Scandinavians, tend to be squeamish about our chicken eggs, so we bathe them and then have to refrigerate them.

But we’re oddballs. Most other countries don’t mind letting unwashed eggs sit next to bread or onions.The difference boils down to two key things: how to go after bacteria that could contaminate them, and how much energy we’re willing to use in the name of safe eggs.

To understand when the rift happened, let’s rewind. About a hundred years ago, many people around the world washed their eggs. But there are a lot of ways to do it wrong, so the method got a bad reputation in certain parts of the world. A batch of rotten eggs, which had been washed in Australia, left a bad impression on its British importers.

By 1970, the U.S. Department of Agriculture had perfected the art of the wash with the help of fancy machines, and it required all egg producers to do it. Meanwhile, many European countries were prohibiting washing, and Asian countries never got on board with it. The exception was Japan, which joined the egg-washers after a bad spate of salmonella in the 1990s.

So what’s the deal with washing and refrigeration? Soon after eggs pop out of the chicken, American producers put them straight to a machine that shampoos them with soap and hot water. The steamy shower leaves the shells squeaky clean. But it also compromises them, by washing away a barely visible sheen that naturally envelops each egg.”The egg is a marvel in terms of protecting itself, and one of the protections is this coating, which prevents them from being porous,” says food writer Michael Ruhlman, author of Egg: A Culinary Exploration of the World’s Most Versatile Ingredient.

Keep reading ….

via Why The U.S. Chills Its Eggs And Most Of The World Doesn’t : The Salt : NPR.

Stress-Busting Diet: 8 Foods That May Boost Resilience : The Salt : NPR

Eat more when you’re stressed? You’re not alone. More than a third of the participants in a national survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health said they change their diets during stressful times.And many of us are quick to turn to either sugary foods or highly refined carbohydrates such as bagels or white pasta when the stress hits.

“There can be a bit of a vicious cycle,” says David Ludwig, a professor of pediatrics and nutrition at Harvard University and a researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital. “When we feel stressed we seek foods that are going to comfort us immediately, but often times those foods lead to surges and crashes in hormones and blood sugar that increase our susceptibility to new stresses.”

Now, of course, we can’t control lots of the events and circumstances that lead to stress. But, Ludwig says, “our body chemistry can very much affect how that stress gets to us.”

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Why the British Don’t Refrigerate Eggs

Why the British Don’t Refrigerate Eggs

Why the British Don't Refrigerate EggsEXPAND

If you’ve ever been to a supermarket in the UK, you were probably surprised (if not a little grossed out) to see stacks of eggs hanging out with nary a refrigerated one in site. As it turns out, we might actually be the crazy ones.

Business Insider did some research on the conundrum, and interestingly enough, British eggs aren’t supposed to be refrigerated because they’re not washed. As BI explains:

In the U.S., the Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires that eggs destined to be sold on supermarket shelves — called graded eggs — are washed and sprayed with a chemical sanitizer before they are sold to the public to reduce the risk of salmonella infection.

In the U.K., Grade A hen eggs may not be washed because the process is thought to “aid the transfer of harmful bacteria like salmonella from the outside to the inside of the egg,” according to the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. In fact, Forbes contributor Nadia Arumugam pointed out that USDA graded eggs could not be legally sold in the U.K. (and the other way around) due to these different preparation methods.

So what does all that have to do with refrigeration? Since the US generally uses factory farm environments to raise our chickens, our eggs are far more susceptible to salmonella contamination. Which means that washing the eggs is absolutely imperative. In the UK, though, farmers prioritize producing “clean eggs at the point of collection, rather than trying to clean them afterwards.”

But as BI notes, “scientists have found that the washing process may damage an outside layer of the egg shell known as the cuticle,” which would make it easier for bacteria to sneak inside. The cooler temperatures of a refrigerator, though, help prevent eggs from deteriorating quite so fast. BI goes on to explain why salmonella just isn’t as big of a problem in the UK as it is in the US. The whole report is fascinating, though, and you can read it in full over at Business Insider here. [Business Insider via Digg]via Why the British Don’t Refrigerate Eggs.

Help! My Egg Yolks Are Freakishly White : The Salt : NPR

Help! My Egg Yolks Are Freakishly White

ARI SHAPIRO and MARIA GODOY

July 17, 2013 5:22 PM

The white egg yolk at left, seen next to a yellow yolk, may seem strange, but it’s just a result of the chicken feed used, scientists say.

Junko Kimura/Getty Images

Dear Salt,

I recently joined President Obama on his trip through Africa, and I brought a mystery home with me. I wonder if you can help me solve it.

I was supposed to take my anti-malaria pills in the morning, with heavy or fatty food. That meant a lot of eggs for breakfast, all across Africa. In Senegal and South Africa, everything seemed normal. Then we arrived at the final stop of the trip, in Tanzania. When I picked up my vegetable omelet from the breakfast buffet at my hotel in Dar es Salaam, one glance suggested they’d accidentally made an egg white omelet. No big deal. I ate it without a second thought.

The next day, President Obama flew home, and I went to a remote island called Mafia for 36 hours of R&R. My first morning at the rustic lodge, I ordered scrambled eggs. They, too, were white. Could this chef have left out the yolks, too? Impossible.

The next day, determined to get to the bottom of this, I ordered my eggs sunny-side-up. (Not my favorite, but a sacrifice I was willing to make in the name of scientific research.) Sure enough, the runny yolks were ghostly pale. I asked the lodge manager, who’d lived in South Africa and England, why the yolks looked more like whites. “Oh, those eggs you get in the U.S. are only yellow because they’re pumped full of hormones,” he said.

But I know that’s not true; I buy my eggs from my neighborhood farmers market, and the yolks are the color of a setting sun.

Could the color of the yolks have something to do with what the chickens are eating, or with the breed of chicken that lays them? I know that some chickens produce eggshells in shades of blue, pink, yellow or brown. Maybe the yolk color varies just as widely? But does that explain why the eggs were pale in both a Dar es Salaam chain hotel and a remote Mafia lodge?

Can you help me unscramble this puzzle?

Yours,

Ari

Dear Ari,

White egg yolks may look bizarre, but poultry scientists I spoke with say there’s nothing to worry about.

“I get that call every once in a while: ‘My birds are freakishly pale!’ ” says Scott Beyer, a poultry specialist with the state of Kansas.

As you suspected, the reason Americans eggs tend to have bright yellow yolks has nothing to do with “hormones” but rather with what we feed our hens. Beyer says egg yolk color is almost entirely influenced by the birds’ diet.

So if you’re feeding birds yellow corn, “it gets in the egg,” he explains. “But if you had a situation where you’re feeding birds white corn, then the egg yolk could be white.”

In South America, hens that peck at red annatto seeds lay eggs with yolks ranging from pink to orange to deep reddish.

The yellow color in egg yolks, as well yellowish chicken skin and fat, comes from pigments found in plants called xanthophylls, primarily lutein, notes Han Jianlin, a geneticist at the International Livestock Research Institute.

In most parts of the world, he says, diners prefer their yolks with a sunnier disposition, so commercial feeds often contain lutein as an additive, though yellow maize, soybeans, carrots and alfafa powder will also do the trick. Sorghum – a grain with much less pigmentation than yellow maize — is used as chicken feed in Tanzania, which probably explains the pallid omelets you encountered.

On the other end of the rainbow, says Beyer, are the yolks in some parts of South America, where hens will peck at dark red annatto seeds. The result? Brilliant yolks ranging from dark orange to red orange to pink, Beyer says.

Many egg eaters assume that darker yolks are a sign of higher nutritional value, but both Beyer and Jianlin independently told me that’s not the case at all. Although chicken feed does influence the nutritional value of birds and their eggs, the researchers say yolk color won’t tell you anything.

— Maria

via Help! My Egg Yolks Are Freakishly White : The Salt : NPR.

Eggs or Cereal – Which Is a Better Breakfast for Weight Loss? – Livestrong.com

I wake up hungry every morning. Starving, to be honest. Sometimes I am actually awakened by my own growling stomach. Consequently, it should be no surprise that I always eat breakfast.

It’s difficult for me to comprehend how some people skip their morning meal. But, according to a 2011 NPD food market research study, 31 million Americans (one in ten people) skip breakfast. One of the top reasons people gave for skipping breakfast was, “they didn’t have time and were too busy.”

I understand what they’re saying about being busy. As the head of content for LIVESTRONG.COM, the third largest health and fitness website, every morning I am rushing to fit in a workout and then get ready for work (all the while reading the news on my phone, checking my email, and my twitter feed), I don’t have a ton of time to eat. Still, I never leave my house without eating breakfast.

Consequently, quick breakfasts are important to me.

I grew up eating cold cereal with milk as breakfast. Raised by a single working mother, cold cereal was the easiest breakfast for us kids to grab quickly (and safely – i.e. no stove or oven required) when we were little and woke up early in the morning in a rush to get ready for school. When you start eating cereal every day at 5 or 6 years old, you develop a habit. And I REALLY loved Golden Grahams. (Now that I know that it contains 20-30 grams of sugar when served with milk it’s all too clear why I loved it so much.)

By high school, college, and into my 20s, my cereal tastes had “matured” somewhat. I almost always ate a rather large (2 serving size) bowl of Kellogg’s Special K, Kellogg’s Product 19, Kashi GOLEAN Crunch, or General Mills Total cereal, and I was convinced that breakfast was my healthiest meal of the day. How could it not be when those cereals’ boxes bragged of being fortified with so manyadded vitamins?!

It never occurred to me that my breakfast of cold cereal might be the reason why I was always starving again several hours before lunchtime.

It wasn’t until I worked at Beachbody and participated as a member of the fitness test groups for RevAbs and LES MILLS COMBAT, the meal plan low carb/high protein. Cereal was not ever a breakfast option on this meal plan. Our breakfasts were always an egg dish of some sort. I thought it would get boring, but I found out that there were a ton of ways to eat eggs that I had never even tried. I lost several pounds in just a few weeks and eating eggs for breakfast was a big part of this. The best part: I was less hungry and more full than when I had been eating cereal for breakfast. No sugar crash to make me cranky.

Why Are Eggs a Better Breakfast Choice Than Cereal?

From this personal weight loss experience, it seemed to me that eggs were a superior breakfast choice than cereal to achieve fullness throughout the morning and weight maintenance or weight loss, but I wanted to understand the science better of why.

By reading labels on cereal boxes and looking online (and tracking a few of my favorite breakfast cereals in MyPlate), I found out that boxed cereal contains a high amount of sugars. A breakfast of one cup of Kashi GOLEAN cereal and one cup of milk contains 26 grams of sugar (13 grams in the cereal and 13 grams in the milk). That’s about 6 teaspoons of sugar!

No wonder I was experiencing a sugar crash and hunger spike halfway through my morning.

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